Posts Tagged ‘skirt’

Jul. 2011 20

THE Summer Skirt

My sister Angela (of the hanging herb garden post as well as the bib necklace) lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, so I don’t get to see her super often. On a recent trip up, we decided to make the most of our time by having a sewing day. So Angela, my mom and I had a fun filled day of making jersey skirts (and one dress!). I made one of these prior to our craft day and it has quickly become a staple in my summer wardrobe. This is THE skirt for summer (well, casual skirt). It’s so comfy, relaxed and cute…it goes with everything!

You’ll need about a yard of fabric per skirt (varies based on desired skirt length). I like the heavier jersey, not the slinky kind for these skirts. Everything is with ½” seam allowance unless otherwise specified.

1. Take your waist measurement and subtract 5”. This is you waist band length.

2. Cut a rectangle 14”x waist band length. You want the stretch to be along the waist band length side

3. With right sides together, stitch along the 14” long side of the waist band

4. Fold top edge down to the bottom edge so you’ll have a tube with the seam from step 3 on the inside. You tube should now be 7” tall

5. For this step, I used the whole width of the fabric (about 58-60” depending on the fabric). Figure out the length you want your skirt, add 1.5” seam allowance, then cut fabric. Trim off the selvage.

6. With right sides together, sew your skirt piece together along the length

7. Using a needle and thread, ruffle the top edge of your skirt. Do this until you reduce the length down to your waist band measurement minute 1” (to account for seam allowance taken)

8. Pin ruffled edge to raw edge (technically both raw edges since they are aligned) of waist band. Sew

9. Hem bottom at 1”

All done!

When wearing, fold your waist band over (like yoga pants) so it will be about 3″. This helps the skirt fit, and looks way better than a 7″ waist band :)

Making the dress version is super simple. You’ll need about 1.5” yards for a full length dress (for a 5’5” girl)

1. Take your rib cage measurement, subtract 5. This is your tube top band length

2. Cut rectangle to 14” x tube top band length.

3. Cut a rectangle 14”x waist band length. You want the stretch to be along the tube top band length side

4. With right sides together, stitch along the 14” long side of the tube top band

5. Fold top edge down to the bottom edge so you’ll have a tube with the seam from step 3 on the inside. You tube should now be 7” tall

6. Measure around your chest where the upper edge of your dress will rest. Subtract 2. Cut a piece of elastic to this length; sew ends together so you have a loop.

7. Work this into your tube top (from steps 5) in between the layers, so that the upper edge of the elastic is against the crease. Pin in place (on outside). Stitch the tube top layers together just below the elastic, creating a casing. Don’t sew over the elastic because that will make it not stretch.

8. For this step, I used the whole width of the fabric (about 58-60” depending on the fabric). Figure out the length you want, add 1.5” seam allowance, then cut fabric. Trim off the selvage.

9. With right sides together, sew your skirt piece together along the length

10. Using a needle and thread, ruffle the top edge of your skirt. Do this until you reduce the length down to your waist band measurement minute 1” (to account for seam allowance taken)

11. Pin ruffled edge to raw edge (technically both raw edges since they are aligned) of waist band. Sew

12. Hem bottom at 1”

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Mar. 2011 23

Pants to Pencil Skirt

Let’s talk a minute about the boyfriend, Vlad. He’s tall, handsome and has excellent taste in clothing both in regards to quality and style. Needless to say, he’s a catch. And so is his wardrobe, or should I say his old wardrobe. Thankfully he has kept most of his old clothes that don’t fit him at his parents house (not to far from where we live). So on a recent trip over to grab so yummy yummy Haitian food, we raided his “childhood” closet. I grabbed the awesome Polo pants with a great brown herringbone pattern. They were to short and small for him anymore, but they fit my (natural) waist perfectly. So I thought, why not a pencil skirt?!

So here’s the tutorial for turning men’s slacks into a pencil skirt:

1. Disassemble.

1a. For this, I took out the pant leg seams, both inside and out. On the inseam, take out the stitch up until the seam is straight vertically (in the butt and crotch areas)

1b. I took out the front seam at the waist band (because front pleats to not look good on high waist skirts.

1c. I took out the side pockets completely. Men’s pockets are huge! This is great for them, but seems to visually pack on pounds on women.

2. Fix the Center seam

2a. You are going to fix the center seam on the front and back the same. So, what you do is pick a leg, we’ll say the right side. Continue the vertical seam from step 1a until you reach the inseam. Add seam allowance (0.5”) and trim excess.

2b. Repeat for left leg. Then stitch together

2c. I surged the seams, but if you don’t have a surger, finish how ever you’d like.

3. While the skirt is inside-out, pin the front and back together. Use chalk to mark out your new side seams. Mark 3” from the bottom

4. Before you sew the sides together, mark and cut your hemline, leaving enough room for a 1” fold

5. On the side seam, mark 3” from bottom hem

6. Sew sides down till 3” mark. Back stitch here

7. Tuck top raw edge into waist band

8. Top stitch (very close to the edge) your waist band shut

9. Like I said before, I use a surger, if you don’t you are going to need to finish this off another way. What I did was finish all the inner seams and the bottom with the surger.

10. Then I folded the opening at the bottom like so, and stitched:

11. Fold bottom up 1” and hem.

Done!