Posts Tagged ‘jersey’

Jul. 2011 20

THE Summer Skirt

My sister Angela (of the hanging herb garden post as well as the bib necklace) lives in Raleigh, North Carolina, so I don’t get to see her super often. On a recent trip up, we decided to make the most of our time by having a sewing day. So Angela, my mom and I had a fun filled day of making jersey skirts (and one dress!). I made one of these prior to our craft day and it has quickly become a staple in my summer wardrobe. This is THE skirt for summer (well, casual skirt). It’s so comfy, relaxed and cute…it goes with everything!

You’ll need about a yard of fabric per skirt (varies based on desired skirt length). I like the heavier jersey, not the slinky kind for these skirts. Everything is with ½” seam allowance unless otherwise specified.

1. Take your waist measurement and subtract 5”. This is you waist band length.

2. Cut a rectangle 14”x waist band length. You want the stretch to be along the waist band length side

3. With right sides together, stitch along the 14” long side of the waist band

4. Fold top edge down to the bottom edge so you’ll have a tube with the seam from step 3 on the inside. You tube should now be 7” tall

5. For this step, I used the whole width of the fabric (about 58-60” depending on the fabric). Figure out the length you want your skirt, add 1.5” seam allowance, then cut fabric. Trim off the selvage.

6. With right sides together, sew your skirt piece together along the length

7. Using a needle and thread, ruffle the top edge of your skirt. Do this until you reduce the length down to your waist band measurement minute 1” (to account for seam allowance taken)

8. Pin ruffled edge to raw edge (technically both raw edges since they are aligned) of waist band. Sew

9. Hem bottom at 1”

All done!

When wearing, fold your waist band over (like yoga pants) so it will be about 3″. This helps the skirt fit, and looks way better than a 7″ waist band :)

Making the dress version is super simple. You’ll need about 1.5” yards for a full length dress (for a 5’5” girl)

1. Take your rib cage measurement, subtract 5. This is your tube top band length

2. Cut rectangle to 14” x tube top band length.

3. Cut a rectangle 14”x waist band length. You want the stretch to be along the tube top band length side

4. With right sides together, stitch along the 14” long side of the tube top band

5. Fold top edge down to the bottom edge so you’ll have a tube with the seam from step 3 on the inside. You tube should now be 7” tall

6. Measure around your chest where the upper edge of your dress will rest. Subtract 2. Cut a piece of elastic to this length; sew ends together so you have a loop.

7. Work this into your tube top (from steps 5) in between the layers, so that the upper edge of the elastic is against the crease. Pin in place (on outside). Stitch the tube top layers together just below the elastic, creating a casing. Don’t sew over the elastic because that will make it not stretch.

8. For this step, I used the whole width of the fabric (about 58-60” depending on the fabric). Figure out the length you want, add 1.5” seam allowance, then cut fabric. Trim off the selvage.

9. With right sides together, sew your skirt piece together along the length

10. Using a needle and thread, ruffle the top edge of your skirt. Do this until you reduce the length down to your waist band measurement minute 1” (to account for seam allowance taken)

11. Pin ruffled edge to raw edge (technically both raw edges since they are aligned) of waist band. Sew

12. Hem bottom at 1”

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Jun. 2010 9

White Jersey Necklace

Ok, let me start of by saying I failed at this project a couple times. I had seen people doing super cute jersey necklaces from t-shirts and I was super excited to make one. But when I tried it with unfinished edges, the fabric started to fall apart. It was going everywhere causing quite a mess in my sewing room. I figured it might be happening because I was using such cheap material. So I trashed my first attempt. For my second attempt, I used a much nice t-shirt (it was in the give away pile anyways). I thought that would help. But noooooo. Still falling apart. Still shedding everywhere. A mess.

But instead of throwing it away, I made the necklace my own way. I tell you this for a couple reasons. One, to admit that I am totally human and fail just as often as I succeed at new projects. And two, so that you don’t think it is weird that my photos don’t match up quite right. You’ll notice the number of strips of fabric gradually decrease. But just bear with me.

All you’ll need is a t-shirt. Mine was a fitted shirt with seams down either side. This adds an extra step, but I go over that in the tutorial. OK, here ya go:

    1. Cut eight 2” strips width-wise across your t-shirt

    1. Cut six 1.5” strips
    2. Cut 1 side of the strips apart (so they won’t be a loop anymore)
      1. SPECIAL STEP!!  If you are using a fitted shirt (with seams down either side) you are going to need to cut the strips apart at both seams. Then, you’ll need to sew the strips back together on 1 end, making sure they are straight. The reason why you need to do this step is so that the strips will be straight pieces. If you don’t cut them apart at the original seams, they form Vs.
    3. Sew the strips together with ¼” seam allowance. You want to sew down both long sides and one short side. You’ll end up with four 1.5” strips and three 1” strips
    4. Turn all the strips right side out. If you’ve never done this, it’s fairly easy, just a little annoying. Here’s some pictures to walk you through


Using locking tweezers, clamp onto the seam (from the inside) at about 2".

Pull the tweezers back out. Be sure not to put too much pressure on the fabric or you'll rip it. As you pull the fabric, it'll start to turn right side out

Keep repeating these steps until your tube/strip is all the way right side out.

    1. Take 2 of the 1.5” strips, twist together. Sew over both ends so they don’t unravel.

  1. Cut a 6” segment off one of the 1.5” segments.
  2. Fold the ends inside so there is a clean edge.
  3. Put the ends from the twisted segments in to the 6” piece. Sew to secure
  4. Now to make some rosettes using the remaining strips. For each strip:
      1. Fold one end over into a triangle (like when making a paper football)

      1. Put the rosette on the table with your finger on the triangle (raw edge facing down)
      2. Swirl the strip around creating a rosette. I found I get the best results when I twist the strip just a little as I go. I also have some sections where the seam of the strip is facing up, and some where it is facing the side. This gives the rosette a good variation height variation and makes it look more like a flower and less like a lollypop.

      1. Tuck the outer end under and in between the next two rows. Just make sure you can’t see it
      2. Secure with a pin.

    1. Sew the whole thing together on the back side. This step is a little tricky. I found it was easier to go from the side half way through, then continue across to the other side. Now matter how you do it, just keep going until you feel like it is secure.
  5. On the 6” flat segment (not the twisted part), arrange your rosettes. Pin in place
  6. Sew the rosettes down to the flat segment.

All done!!!

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